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Minnesota bill against female genital mutilation raises opposition

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After the bill’s near-unanimous passage in the House, longtime critics of the practice have raised concerns about the measure, leading to some second thoughts.

Opposition from some members of Minnesota’s immigrant and refugee communities is slowing the momentum of a bill that would impose stiff penalties for parents involved in cases of female genital mutilation.

Since the bill’s near-unanimous passage in the Minnesota House this week, some longtime critics of the ritual have met with senators, lobbied the governor’s office and handed out fliers — all to raise alarm about the legislation.

The Council for Minnesotans of African Heritage, a nonprofit called Isuroon and other groups argue that the legislation carries overly harsh punishment and unintended consequences, including the possibility that newcomers from countries where genital cutting is widespread would not seek medical care and other services for their children. They call for a less punitive approach focused on educating parents.

Now, the author of the Senate version is voicing second thoughts about approving the legislation yet this session, though Senate GOP leadership have not committed to a course of action. “We all agree this practice is absolutely horrible, and something needs to be done,” said the author, Sen. Karin Housley. “How can we empower communities to address this practice from within rather than having Big Brother come down and say, ‘This is wrong?’ ”

Rep. Mary Franson, who introduced the House bill, said the Senate is bowing to pressure from groups “more concerned with perception than doing the right thing and protecting girls.”

“Watering down the bill really does a disservice to the little girls who are in danger,” she said.

Deqa Hussein took pictures as Rep. Mary Franson spoke during Thursday’s meeting. Hussein also spoke out at the event encouraging women to be proactive in protecting children.

Concerns about the bill

Franson’s bill makes it a felony for parents to subject their daughters to the procedure and calls for loss of custody and prison terms from five to 20 years, depending on the extent of the injuries. It also increases penalties for those who perform the procedure, which has been illegal since pioneering Minnesota legislation in the 1990s.

The bill won support from all but four of the 128 House members who voted, including Rep. Ilhan Omar, the country’s first Somali-American legislator.

Fadumo Abdinur, one of several Somali-American women who testified in favor of the bill, said stiff penalties are needed to root out a practice that leaves girls and women with long-term health problems. Abdinur, who experienced genital cutting, did not get her period until she was 20, and only after a Texas physician partly reversed her procedure. She also suffered painful periods and intercourse.

“I don’t want any girl to go through this,” she said. “I will talk against it for the rest of my life.”

Lul Hersi, a St. Cloud mother of four and a supporter of the bill, says the United States should warn refugee parents against rushing to have their daughters cut before traveling to the United States — and disqualify them from resettlement if they do: “The parents know the risks they’re putting their kids in.”

Fartun Weli of Isuroon, which won a $180,000 federal grant this winter to educate health care providers about the procedure, stresses that she does not condone the practice.

But she and other critics balk at separating girls from their families, which they argue victimizes them a second time. They say they worry about families arriving from places where the practice is deeply rooted. An amendment to Franson’s bill states the penalties apply only if the ritual is practiced in the United States. But Haji Yusuf, a Somali community leader in St. Cloud, questions whether authorities can always readily determine that.

For parents who came to the United States with girls who’d already undergone the procedure, the bill, which mandates reporting to authorities by health care providers and others, could discourage doctor visits.

The bill requires Minnesota’s health commissioner to provide outreach and education about the dangers of female genital mutilation (FGM) in immigrant communities — and to seek private funds to do that. The lack of designated funding for education, including for law enforcement and mandated reporters, is an issue for Ann Hill in the state’s Office of the Ombudsperson for Families, which has also raised concerns about the bill.

Brikti Hiwet, an Ethiopian-American elder and reproductive health lecturer at the University of Minnesota and St. Catherine University who attended Monday’s hearing, said she felt lawmakers had a “knee-jerk reaction” to the issue. She says existing state and federal laws prohibiting the practice are effective.

“How can you protect children when you take them away from their families and put them in foster care?” she said.

Hodan Hassan, a mental health clinician, also argues for a less punitive approach.

“When I read the bill, my heart sank,” Hassan said. “It criminalizes parents who don’t understand the legality of their actions and don’t have the ability to advocate for themselves.”

Hassan says lawmakers should not scrap the bill but should revisit and revise it.

Weli says she worries the House discussion framed the issue as a Somali community problem when almost a dozen immigrant communities in Minnesota hail from countries that practice genital cutting. At least one of the Minnesota girls whose parents took them to a Michigan doctor now charged with performing the procedure — the case that inspired the House bill — was not Somali, according to child protection documents.

“All our mothers went through this. Some of our sisters who grew up in Africa went through this. Our daughters won’t go through this because so much has changed,” said Abdullah Kiatamba, a West African community leader.

Aim is to protect girls

Franson says the bill’s intent is clear: protecting girls. So is the language in the bill that limits penalties to those who live in the United States when the practice takes place. She says loss of custody must be a consequence of a procedure that causes girls lifelong harm.

“America is the land of the brave and the home of the free,” she said. “Little girls who moved here from other countries have the right to be free from the oppression of female genital mutilation.”

She pointed to an event the nonprofit Voice of East African Women planned to hold Thursday evening as evidence that immigrant supporters of the bill have already taken on the task of educating communities about it.

But Housley, who met with Weli and Kaade Wallace of the Council for Minnesotans of African Heritage, said she wants to ensure senators get broad input and consider unintended consequences before they act — and time is running out this session.

“When laws get made this quickly, that’s when mistakes get made,” she said.

Kiatamba says the bill’s passage seems to have sparked an open conversation on a rarely discussed issue.

“Something dramatic needs to happen and bring this issue out of the shadows,” he said.

mila.koumpilova@startribune.com 612-673-4781 faiza.mahamud@startribune.com 612-673-4203

Crime

Somalia’s first forensic lab targets rape impunity

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AFP — Garowe – The new freezers at Somalia’s only forensic laboratory can store thousands of DNA samples, although for now there are just five.

The big hope is that they could be the start of a revolution in how the troubled Horn of Africa country tackles its widespread sexual violence – provided some daunting hurdles are overcome.

The first sample arrived at the start of the year taken on a cotton swab from the underwear of a woman, a rape victim from the village of Galdogob.

It was wrapped in paper and driven 250km to the Puntland Forensic Centre in Garowe, capital of semi-autonomous Puntland, slipped into a protective glass tube and placed in one of the three ultra-low temperature fridges.

If DNA ID can be teased from the sample, this would be a crucial step in convicting the woman’s rapist.

No longer would it be a case of he-said-she-said, in which the survivor is less often believed than the accused. Two decades of conflict and turmoil have made Somalia a place where lawlessness and sexual violence are rampant.

“Now, people who have been raped hide because they don’t have evidence,” said Abdifatah Abdikadir Ahmed, who heads the Garowe police investigations department.

But with the lab, he said, “it’s a scientific investigation. There are biological acts you can zero in on.”

Challenges

Not yet, however.

Abdirashid Mohamed Shire, who runs the lab, has a team of four technicians ready but is awaiting the arrival of the final pieces of equipment.

Their work to provide the evidence that might convict or exonerate is yet to begin.

And the pressure is on. The freezers mean the DNA samples can be safely stored for years but Somali law allows a rape suspect to be held for a maximum of 60 days. Shire needs the analysis and identification machines urgently so that, as he put it, “justice will be timely served”.

The laboratory, partly funded by Sweden, was launched last year after the Puntland state government enacted a Sexual Offences Act in 2016, which criminalised sexual offences and imposed tough penalties.

But technology alone will not solve Somalia’s many judicial weaknesses.

The DNA sample from Galdogob, for example, was stored in unclear and unrefrigerated conditions for five days before being sent to the lab, meaning a defence counsel could potentially argue the DNA evidence had been tampered with.

Human rights lawyers worry the new lab might backfire for this reason.

“A lot of thought needs to be given to how the chain of custody can be preserved in these kinds of cases,” said Antonia Mulvey of Legal Action Worldwide, a Kenya-based non-profit organisation.

More fundamental still is the failure of Somalia’s police to take sexual assault cases – and their jobs – seriously.

Corruption is rife, with a legal advisor to Puntland’s justice ministry saying officers “meddle” in cases, undermining them for personal gain.

“My concern is that the corrupted system could not make a sure success of the lab,” the advisor said, requesting anonymity to speak candidly. “Investing in the lab is good, but we need to think about the preconditions.”

The UN Population Fund (UNFPA) which helped pay for the lab is trying to address this by running training programmes for dozens of the Garowe police on sample collection, gender violence investigations and documentation.

But, the legal advisor cautioned that donors can only do so much.

“The issue is more complicated than training police. It relates to the political commitment of the government. UNFPA can train police but who will pay those you train? Are they given power to do the work?”

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Minnesota vaccination activists now are seeking political allies

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A severe measles outbreak sickened dozens of Minnesotans last year and threw a harsh light on activists with vaccination concerns, but now they are back, believing they have gained the political clout to push through legislation that would alert parents to the rare but documented risks of vaccines.

At a forum for state legislators on Wednesday, leaders of the Vaccine Safety Council of Minnesota hope to persuade lawmakers to support an “informed consent” bill, which would require doctors to discuss risks with parents before vaccinating babies.

“There’s been a shift in this country,” said Jennifer Larson, a leader of the nonprofit council and an organization called Healthchoice that organized the forum. “I think it’s tough for anyone to say more information is not better.”

Larson said her group is not anti-vaccine; they believe consumers just need more upfront information about risks. But state health officials worry that opponents want to promote unproven claims that could unnecessarily scare people away from vaccinations.

With 79 confirmed cases, last year’s measles outbreak was Minnesota’s largest in 27 years, and falling vaccination rates in the state’s Somali community played a role, said Kris Ehresmann, who directs vaccination programs for the state Health Department.

“Seventy-one of 79 were unvaccinated,” she said. “It was very much an outbreak driven by lack of vaccination.”

State records show that more than 90 percent of Minnesota children enter kindergarten vaccinated for infectious diseases such as tetanus, measles, hepatitis B, and chickenpox.

But survey data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show a small decline in certain immunizations. And President Donald Trump proposed a safety commission to address vaccine concerns, though plans for that panel have stalled and the president didn’t mention vaccines in his State of the Union address last week.

Public health officials also found themselves on the defensive after a report out of Australia late last year, while not related directly to pediatric immunizations, that found that the seasonal flu vaccine is only 10 percent protective. CDC estimates for the effectiveness of the flu vaccine between 2004 and 2017 ranged from a low of 10 percent to as high as 60 percent in any one flu season. The vaccine effectiveness fluctuates because the predominant flu strain is not the same each year.

Anxiety about the safety of vaccines has created an active coalition that includes some Minnesota refugee families, proponents of “natural” medicine, and parents who believe disabilities in their children can be traced back to shots they received.

Larson is the owner of an IT business and an autism treatment center, and recently was named finance chair of the Republican Party of Minnesota, though she stressed in an interview that the new role is separate from her advocacy on vaccines.

Larson said she took on the issues of vaccine administration and informed consent after her son, now 17, developed autism following his infant vaccinations.

“My son had a very clear reaction,” she said.

The autism theory has bedeviled public health advocates, because no broadly accepted studies have proved a link between vaccines and the developmental disorder. Some who have claimed this link have been discredited. But the mere thought of a link has scared some parents into refusing or delaying vaccinations for their children, because autism is more alarming to them than diseases such as polio that largely have been eradicated by vaccination campaigns.

Larson said she believes health officials have exaggerated the safety of vaccines. She noted that the federal government’s National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program has paid $3.8 billion since 1988 to people who claimed vaccine-related illnesses or reactions. “Parents want to be told everything before they inject something into their child,” she said.

Speakers at the legislators’ forum this week will include Del Bigtree, who directed “Vaxxed,” a movie about a federal whistleblower who alleged that the government suppressed information about an autism link, and a Minneapolis woman who received federal compensation after she claimed that her son suffered a disabling reaction from the pertussis vaccine.

Larson supports legislation authored by state Rep. Cindy Pugh, R-Chanhassen, that would require doctors to disclose that neither they nor vaccine manufacturers are liable if they give shots that cause complications, and that scheduled combinations of vaccinations at single office visits haven’t been studied for safety.

Pugh did not comment for this article.

Ehresmann said federal law already requires doctors to give “vaccine information statements” to parents, and the state checks to make sure pediatricians are doing so. The statements refer to vaccine risks and the compensation fund, but also the benefits of vaccine and the threats caused by the infections they target.

“These [vaccines] protect children against some serious diseases,” said Ehresmann, recalling the case of a severe Hib (Haemophilus influenzae B) infection that occurred after parents delayed their child’s shots.

The Minnesota Medical Association, which represents the state’s doctors, opposes Pugh’s bill, according to a spokesman, because it only requires vaccine-risk information that would discourage parents, and does not require information about the risks of children being unvaccinated.

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Health

Somalis Train to Improve First Aid Response Skills

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VOA — Somalia’s capital, Mogadishu, has been rocked by explosions for years set off by Al-Shabab militants battling to overthrow the weak U.N.-backed government. The frequent bombings have killed or injured thousands of civilians. Now, first responders are offering first aid classes to help Somalis learn how to help their neighbors before the ambulance arrives. Faith Lapidus reports.

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