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US demos RQ-11 to Djibouti as it provides AMISOM with UAV expertise

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The United States military’s Combined Joint Task Force – Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) has conductedan RQ-11 Raven unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) demonstrationfor the Djiboutian military, as it provides a UAV surveillance system to the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM).

A CJTF-HOA spokesperson told IHS Jane’s that a United Kingdom-led intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) training course was held for AMISOM personnel in Mogadishu ahead of the system’s arrival. The course concluded on 25 August and involved CJTF-HOA personnel.

IHS Jane’s reports that the project involves providing AMISOM with a contractor-owned and -operated system, but other details were not forthcoming.

Meanwhile, on 21 August, US Army Soldiers assigned to the CJTF-HOA Task Force Warrior, deployed to Camp Lemonnier from the 1st Battalion, 153rd Infantry Regiment, conducted the first official demonstration of the Raven RQ-11 to Djibouti Armed Forces (FAD) personnel.

According to the US instructors, the demonstration served multiple purposes. It was a chance to effectively familiarize FAD members with the unmanned aerial vehicle system, clear up confusion between the RQ-11 Raven and other UAVs, and demonstrate that the Raven can be operated safely.

The demonstration was led by US Army Staff Sgt. Michael Martin, assigned to Task Force Warrior. Martin, along with a team of Soldiers currently completing certification in Raven operations, explained the specifications of the system, conducted a flight demonstration, and allowed the FAD soldiers to view a simulation of the system’s surveillance capabilities.

With a 4.5 foot wingspan and a weight just a little more than four pounds, the Raven system offers aerial observation for about a six mile range. It is launched by hand and thrown into the air. It can provide intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance in day and night time conditions.

“Due to the fact that the FAD doesn’t have RPA in their military and have yet to see small RPA operations, this demonstration will hopefully provide clarity,” said US Navy Cmdr. Hyun Chun, Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa liaison to the FAD.

After the hands-on demo, the FAD officers plan to report their findings to their chain of command to determine if the RQ-11 will benefit FAD operations that will help maintain stability and security in Djibouti and beyond, CJTF-HOA said.

“A couple of other AMISOM [African Union Mission in Somalia] troop contributing countries (TTC) are using Raven for their deployed units,” said Chun. “The FAD will review if Ravens will improve their operations, especially in Somalia.”

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KENYA

Intelligence report reveals Kenyan Al Shabaab leader likely to leave the terror group

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An intelligence report has revealed that Kenyan-born Al Shabaab leader, Ahmed Iman, is contemplating to quit the terror group after major fall-out with its leadership.

The report says the Imam wants to quit the group and its activities after he became disgruntled with the persistent killing of Kenyan fighters within the group’s ranks.

The dossier further notes that the spate of elimination and execution of Kenyans and other foreign fighters has brought a sharp division within Al Shabaab leading to hatred towards native Somalis.

“The Al Shabaab video and online propagandist, Ahmed Iman Ali fell-out with its leadership. It is reported he is negotiating his way back from Somalia.

It is not, however, clear if he stands a chance of making it from Somalia considering that Al Shabaab kills whoever attempts to leave. Iman has been very vocal against the execution of foreign fighters and is now weighing out his options,” the report. It further adds:

“Some Al Shabaab leaders are, however, wary of losing Iman within the ranks as he has proven to be a good propaganda tool through his videos which he does with charisma taunting AMISOM forces in fluent Swahili.” Iman is the leader of ‘Jaysh Ayman’. He has been instrumental in recruiting youth into terrorism and orchestrating attacks in Kenya.
The split is further accelerated by the battle on whom to pledge their allegiance to with one group led by former UK-based Abdul Qadir Mumin, who swore allegiance to ISIS in December 2015 immediately becoming target of exclusion. Al Shabaab has always pledged its allegiance to Al Qaeda. Online war Al Shabaab’s intelligence wing (amniyaat) has on several occasions targeted the pro-ISIS splinter group whose top commanders have been executed alongside their fighters.

There has been an online war of words on Twitter where ISIS linked page, Jabha East Africa, blamed Al Shabaab of killing and imprisoning their leaders and fighters.

The Al Shabaab and ISIS supremacy war was put to test during the Mogadishu October attack where more than 350 civilians were killed and several others injured.

Even though none claimed responsibility, it is evident that the pro-ISIS group were rescarried out the attack to show Al Shabaab on how strong they are in executing suicide bombings. When contacted, the Somalia Minister of Information, Culture and Tourism Abdirahman Omar Osman said that the government has come up with a Comprehensive Approach to Security (CAS) architecture in consultation with stakeholders and international partners.

“We now have plans to scale down AMISOM forces so that Somalia forces can take over the security of our country. We are optimistic We Africans are not good at publicising our successes and if this mission would have been in Western, the whole world would have known the success,” Osman said.

The minister said the October attack in Mogadishu was an act of desperation because the Somalia military and AMISOM are winning. Largest number The Information minister insists that his security counterpart is committed to implementing initiatives that include stabilisation of security within Mogadishu and removal of heavy guns from the city’s streets.

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Somali News

Under Trump, The Pentagon Has Been Quietly Escalating Its Presence In Somalia

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Like Niger, the increase in US troops deployed to Somalia has gone largely unnoticed.

BUZZFEED — The Trump administration has been quietly but rapidly escalating its campaign against al-Qaeda-linked militants in Somalia, launching almost daily drone strikes in recent days and increasing the number of US troops deployed there almost tenfold since May.

Like Niger, where a growing US military presence was widely recognized only after four US troops were killed last month, the expansion in Somalia has been largely unnoticed. But this week, the Pentagon acknowledged that the number of US troops in Somalia had grown to 500 from 50 in the spring and that US aircraft had struck targets of the al-Shabaab terrorist group six days in a row.

The growing Somalia presence now rivals the US presence in Syria, where defense officials say 503 US troops currently are operating.

Still, US officials deny that the US is ramping up its involvement in Somalia 24 years after 18 US soldiers died in conflict, as memorialized in the movie Black Hawk Down.

“I would not associate that with a buildup,” Lt. Gen. Kenneth McKenzie, director of the Pentagon’s Joint Staff, told reporters on Thursday. “I think it’s just the flow of forces in and out as different organizations come in that might be sized a little differently.”

A series of five US air strikes in Somalia killed 40 al-Shabaab and ISIS fighters between Nov. 9 and 12, according to the Pentagon. A sixth strike killed “several” more on Wednesday. The US military has carried out 28 drone strikes in the country this year, with 15 of those happening in the last three months, according to the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, which tracks the strikes.

There were 15 strikes against al-Shabaab in all of 2016. Even so, defense officials denied that this was an escalation.

“I certainly don’t think there’s a ramp-up of attacks,” McKenzie said. “There’s no particular rhythm to (striking targets), except that as they become available and as we’re able to process them and vet them, we strike.”

This month, the US also conducted the first strikes against ISIS targets in Somalia. Pentagon officials say the US is keeping a close eye on the movement of foreign fighters out of Iraq and Syria as ISIS is pushed back there, but gave no details on whether they might be trekking into Somalia.

“US forces will continue to use all authorized and appropriate measures to protect Americans and to disable terrorist threats,” US Africa Command said Wednesday in a statement on the strikes.

While al-Shabaab has called for attacks on the US and the West, and even featured comments by President Donald Trump about Muslims in a 2016 recruitment video, it has not carried out any attacks outside the region. The insurgents, who seek to impose their strict version of Islam on the country, have been fighting to recapture territory they’ve lost to African Union peacekeepers and topple Somalia’s Western-backed government.

Last month, al-Shabaab was blamed for the deadliest terrorist attack in Somalia’s history, a truck bomb that killed more than 350 people when it detonated at a busy intersection in Mogadishu, the country’s capital. Al-Shabaab also has been blamed for many other attacks, including the September 2013 siege of the Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi that left at least 67 dead. It also has stepped up the sophistication of its attacks, nearly succeeding in bringing down a Somali commercial aircraft in February by hiding a bomb in a laptop computer.

A small number of US forces have been in Somalia on so-called advise-and-assist missions since 2013, working with the country’s military to plan and support raids against al-Shabaab. One such raid, targeting a terrorist compound in May, led to the first US combat fatality in Somalia since the Black Hawk Down attack in 1993. A Navy SEAL was killed and two other US service members were wounded.

The recently intensified campaign comes after the Trump administration in March gave the military broader authority to carry out counterterrorism strikes in Somalia, relaxing rules meant to avoid civilian deaths. Two months earlier, the White House had made a similar move in Yemen, giving the military more freedom to target al-Qaeda militants.

“It’s very important and very helpful for us to have little more flexibility, a little bit more timeliness, in terms of the decision-making process,” Gen. Thomas Waldhauser, who oversees US troops in Africa, explained in March. “It allows us to prosecute targets in a more rapid fashion.”

Under the previous restrictions imposed by President Barack Obama in 2013, raids and air strikes were vetted by multiple agencies, and targets could be struck only if they posed a threat to Americans and could be hit without killing civilians.

The loosened rules have led to some “very disturbing” incidents where civilians have died, setting off a furious debate among leaders of the fragile central government, said Roland Marchal, an expert on al-Shabaab at the Paris Institute of Political Studies, known as Sciences Po, who had just returned from Mogadishu when he spoke to BuzzFeed News on Friday.

In one incident, 10 civilians, including three children, were killed in a US-backed raid in August in the village of Barire. The wrapped bodies of the victims were displayed in the capital to garner media attention, as the deputy governor of the region described how unarmed farmers had been killed “one by one.”

US Africa Command confirmed that US troops had participated in the raid and that it was “aware of the civilian casualty allegations near Barire.” It said it would conduct an assessment but didn’t respond to a request for comment about the inquiry.

“This was a really bad moment for the government, a lot of infighting and turmoil with people saying contradictory things, they had to pay the families blood money, and at the end of the day nothing has improved on the ground,” said Marchal. “The US [efforts] are not becoming any more popular.”

Faulty intelligence has also hampered some previous US strikes. A September 2016 strike in Galcayo, a city more than 350 miles northeast of Mogadishu, killed local militia forces allied with the US, not al-Shabaab fighters as the Pentagon had thought.

Simply increasing the body count of al-Shabaab militants is unlikely to significantly change the group’s hold in the region, Marchal said.

“You may be counting the corpses of militants and make wonderful statements of victory, but politically you’re losing,” he said. “People have to be aware that this overwhelming military approach is dysfunctional. … On the ground there’s a situation where you may be killing important figures, but it’s difficult to believe that this will significantly harm al-Shabaab because it’s a widespread organization and the Americans are targeting military commanders who could be replaced.”

In May, Mattis attended a conference on Somalia in London, where he had a private meeting with Somali President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed.

“I came away from that heartened,” he told reporters returning from the trip.

Mattis said international partners were working on “a reconciliation program designed to pull the fence-sitters and the middle-of-the-roaders away from al-Shabaab.”

US operations in Africa have been under scrutiny since the Oct. 4 ambush in Niger that killed four US soldiers, which drew attention to the little-known US involvement on the African continent. Lawmakers admitted they had no idea that the Pentagon had deployed more than 800 troops to that country.

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Briefing Room

U.S. says fresh drone strike in Somalia kills “several” Al-Shabaab militants

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Samuel Chamberlain

The US Africa Command announced the U.S. military conducted another airstrike in Somalia on Tuesday killing ‘several militants’ belonging to the terrorist group, al-Shabaab.

A defense official tells Fox that a drone carried out the strike 60 miles northwest of the capital, Mogadishu. The U.S. military has carried out airstrikes for six consecutive days in Somalia beginning last Thursday, killing over 45 al-Shabaab and ISIS fighters.

A spokeswoman from U.S. Africa Command tells Fox News it is not immediately clear if any more strikes have been launched Wednesday.

Earlier this month the US launched the first airstrikes against ISIS in Somalia. Last month, the U.S. conducted its first strikes against ISIS in Yemen, days after the ISIS so-called capital in Raqqa, Syria crumbled.

There have been roughly 30 airstrikes in Somalia in 2017 after President Trump authorized the military to begin conducting offensive airstrikes against terrorists groups in Somalia.

The rise of airstrikes in Somalia and Yemen coincides with more bombs being dropped in Afghanistan as thousands of American troops arrive to ramp up the fight against the Taliban.

The U.S. has dropped twice as many bombs on the Taliban and an ISIS affiliate in Afghanistan this year than all of last year, according to a new report from the U.S. Air Force.

As the ISIS fight in Iraq and Syria winds down, more jets are being tasked to conduct strikes in Afghanistan. The U.S.-led air wars in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan are run out of the same operations center on a base in Qatar.

There are roughly 400 US troops on the ground in Somalia. In May, a Navy SEAL was killed fighting al-Shabaab, the first US combat death in Somalia since the “Black Hawk Down” incident in 1993.

“Al-Shabaab has pledged allegiance to al-Qaeda and is dedicated to providing safe haven for terrorist attacks throughout the world. Al-Shabaab has publicly committed to planning and conducting attacks against the U.S. and our partners in the region,” said US Africa Command in a statement.

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