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Seven challenges standing in the way of Somali prosperity



Clan supremacy, corruption, and external actors are just a few of the things preventing Somalia’s emergence as a stable and functioning state.

There are seven major challenges standing in the way of building a strong, prosperous and united Somalia. They are like seven snakes wrapped around the nation — and Somalia won’t move forward unless we, Somalis, untangle them all.

The supremacy of the clan is a cancer to Somali society. It’s eating away at the nation. It’s structured like an onion — there are sub-clans, sub-sub-clans and so on till your cousin becomes someone else.

There are several major clans and a few dozen minority clans. The big ones fight among themselves; vying for power. They also discriminate and abuse minority clans.

To most Somalis, allegiance to your clan is the primary focus of loyalty. Other factors, such as Islam and nationhood, are abstract secondary ideas — a matter of convenience.

Every large clan claims to be the most beautiful, the most intelligent, and the most powerful. We are clan supremacists. Therefore, powerful clans feel they have the God-given right to control and dominate others.

This is Somalia’s greatest weakness as a nation. It creates conflict, injustice, and mistrust. Our enemies exploit this to divide and rule us. We, Somalis, have to realise that in the modern world, clan cannot be a substitute for a nation.

Corruption is rife in every sector and at every level. It’s a societal problem. Nothing will get done without paying bribes; whether you want to get a document from the local authority or run for the highest offices in the country. Officials ‘invest’ in their future and they have to make a profit — a big profit.

Stealing money from an individual is seen as being against ‘Somali culture’ and even ‘un-Islamic.’ Stealing public funds, however, and taking or giving bribes, is often seen as a clever move. We see people praising corrupt individuals. “So and so is very clever. He was holding his government post for a few months. Look, he’s built a big house for himself, bought cars and established a big businesses.”

It’s a rare occurrence when someone asks how the money was attained. We are unwittingly condoning corruption instead of condemning it.

The business community: Somalia hasn’t had a functioning central government for nearly three decades. A lack of regulation has created ‘dodgy’ millionaires in every sector.

For instance, there are some who import expired goods cheaply; turning Somalia into a dumping ground for all sorts of hazardous products. In particular, expired food and medicines are causing death and suffering amongst the population.

These irresponsible businessmen do not value human lives. They sell products at inflated prices to inflate their bottom line.

Paying tax and contributing to the common good is not in their mission statement. For them, any form of authority or regulation is unwelcome. They work with groups, Somalis or otherwise, that knowingly prevent the materialisation of a functioning Somali state.

They know how to silence their critics. Government officials, including ministers, fear for their lives and cannot even mount a challenge. Most of them want Somalia to remain a lawless place. They don’t know any other way. To them, profit comes before the interest of the Somali nation.

Al Shabab is the most visible problem in the international arena. The al Qaeda-linked group controls large parts of southern and central Somalia. They want to establish their so-called ideal Islamic nation. Al Shabab militants regularly carry out bombings and targeted killings. Somalis, as a result, are losing their lives and their livelihoods.

The bigger issue, however, is that Al Shabab is being used as a means to achieve other goals. Forces from Ethiopia, Kenya, several other African nations, America, Britain and many unknown actors all operate within Somalia — and all have separate agendas. Certainly, Somalis don’t believe they are there to help.

The rebuilding of the Somali nation is seemingly becoming an anti-Al Shabab project. We are at the frontline of the so-called ‘War on Terror.’ War can be a profitable business and to some, Somalia is ‘a good project’ and ‘long it may continue.’

Our leaders must be brave enough to seek dialogue with Al Shabab and to bring this conflict to an end.

Neighbouring countries, in particular Ethiopia and Kenya, are currently part of the African Union forces fighting Al Shabab. Nevertheless, their hostility towards Somalia predates the militants.

They dedicate energy and resources to prevent Somalia from becoming a strong and prosperous nation. Why? Ethiopia and Kenya both occupy territories inhabited by Somalis; the Ogaden and the NFD (National Frontier District) respectively.

These are artificial boundaries that separate families. Widespread abuses against the Somali populations under Ethiopian and Kenyan authorities are well documented. Naturally, Somalis want their basic human right to unite and live under one flag as a nation. Somalia fought disastrous wars against these countries to regain the control of the Ogaden and the NFD.

Ethiopia and Kenya fear a powerful Somalia and feel it is in their interest that Somalia remain weak and divided. But if we are to ever achieve a lasting peace in the region, then Ethiopia and Kenya must accept the redrawing of the artificial boundaries set by European occupiers. Let Somalis live in peace as a family.

Western governments led by the US and the UK, have been doing more harm than good in Somalia. Historically, European colonisers divided the Somali nation, and later gave the land and people to their Ethiopian and Kenyan allies. This created a state of permanent hostility between Somalia and its neighbours.

Then came the arming of Somali warlords, who raped and murdered innocent Somalis. Today, it’s about fighting Al Shabab. Western governments repeatedly claim that they give millions of dollars to ‘help’ Somalis. But they cannot show a single school, hospital, road or anything concrete that they have done. It’s usually ‘we work in the security sector.’ If pouring more weapons into Somalia or assisting those sabotaging the nation is ‘help’, then Somalis can’t afford it.

The downing of two American Black Hawks in 1993 still haunts US foreign policy circles. Now America has mainly outsourced on the ground fighting to Somalias tradition foes, Kenya and Ethiopia.
The downing of two American Black Hawks in 1993 still haunts US foreign policy circles. Now America has mainly outsourced on the ground fighting to Somalias tradition foes, Kenya and Ethiopia.
Finally, there’s ‘The Nairobi Mafia,’ a term used by Somalis to describe a coalition of diplomats, journalists, so-called experts, consultants, international NGOs, former Somali warlords, and businessmen. These people work in cahoots and are the go-to guys for Somali affairs.

In fact, they have been running Somalia from their Nairobi offices for many years; advising and influencing key international players. With thousands of workers, the industry is the biggest employer in Somalia (many of them are not Somalis and don’t live in the country). Most of them earn a handsome salary, live in big villas and lead a comfortable life. Hence, they regard the establishment of a Somali authority as a threat to their livelihood. They discredit and dehumanise any Somali who attempts to challenge their power.

Untangling all these snakes will be a huge challenge. But Somalis have had to overcome unimaginable obstacles in the past and I am confident the new generation will prevail.

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Civil strife in Ethiopia has the potential to destabilise the whole region



Ethiopia is experiencing ethnic and political tensions that could have far-reaching implications for its neighbors in the Horn of Africa, and beyond.

Abukar Arman is a writer, a former diplomat and an activist whose work on foreign policy, geopolitics and faith is widely published.

The Horn of Africa is among the most congested, eventful, and most volatile geopolitical intersections on earth. It is where the West meets the East in a highly competitive game of strategic positioning for economic or hegemonic advantage.

China and Turkey who, more or less, employ similar soft-power strategies have tangible investments in various countries in the region, including Ethiopia. However, the widespread discontent with Ethiopia’s repressive impulses and its ethnic favoritism that led to a particular ethnic minority (Tigray) to exclusively operate the state apparatus has inspired Arab Spring-like mass protests. These protests have caused serious rancor within the ruling party. It is only a matter of time before this haemorrhaging government might collapse.

So, who is likely to gain or lose from this imminent shockwave in the region’s balance of power?

The Nile Tsunami

Ethiopia — a country previously considered as a stable regional hegemon, a robust emerging market, and a reliable counter-terrorism partner — is on the verge of meltdown, if not long-term civil strife.

Today, the Ethiopian government is caught between two serious challenges of domestic and foreign nature: the Oromo/Amhara mass protests tacitly supported by the West, and the water rights conflict with Egypt, Sudan and Somalia.

Ethiopia is claiming the lion’s share on the Nile that runs through it and other rivers that flow from its highlands for the Grand Renaissance Dam – thus presenting existential threats to the connected nations.

For the third time in three years, the Shabelle River has dried up, putting millions of Somalis at risk of starvation.

But the current government is not ready for a substantive change of guard. The longer the mass protests continue and the minority-led government continues to offer artificial or symbolic gestures of prisoner releases — while declaring a second ‘state of emergency’ in two years— the faster Ethiopia will become destabilised and the faster foreign investments will fizzle away.

Worse — though seemingly unthinkable — the ‘favorite nation’ status granted to Ethiopia after becoming the US’ main partner in the global ‘War on Terroris’ is slowly corroding.

Despite this week’s visit from US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, the US State Department is gradually turning its back on Ethiopia for a number of reasons; chief among them, is its double-dealings on the South Sudan issue.

Despite the facade of US/China collaboration to end the South Sudan civil war, the geopolitical rivalry between these two giants has been pressuring Ethiopia to pledge exclusive allegiance to one over the other.

With China’s huge investments on Ethiopia, Sudan and South Sudan’s oil fields – making a choice won’t be too difficult.

The Kenya Factor

Several years ago I wrote an article arguing that the two most stable nations in the Horn (Kenya and Ethiopia) will become more unstable as Somalia becomes more stable.

Today, the Ethiopian government is facing the most serious threat since it took power by the barrel of the gun, and Kenya has a highly polarised population and two presidents ‘elected’ along clan lines.

Kenya — the nerve center of the international humanitarian industry — could just be one major incident away from inter-clan combustion.

The Somalia Factor

The Ethiopian government has launched a clandestine campaign of strategic disinformation intended to fracture or breakup opposition coalitions and recruit or lure potential comrades.

Ethiopian intelligence officers and members of the diplomatic corps together with some ethnic-Somali Ethiopians have been recruiting naive Somali government officials, intellectuals and activists with a Machiavellian disinformation campaign.

Meanwhile, IGAD — Ethiopia’s regional camouflage — calls for an open-borders agreement between member states. Despite broad-based public perception that for a fragile state like Somalia, such an agreement would be tantamount to annexation, some Somali politicians are eagerly carrying its banner.

These kinds of desperate campaigns and the abrupt resignation of Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn only underscore the fact that the government’s days are numbered.

The Sudan Factor

Sudan is caught in a loyalty triangle (Ethiopia, Egypt and Turkey) with competing powers. Sudan needs Egypt to address threats faced by the two nations regarding the diminishing access to the Nile by reasserting rights granted through the Anglo-Egyptian Treaty.

It needs Ethiopia to protect China’s economic partnership and to shield President Omar al Bashir from Western harassment through IGAD.

It also needs Turkey for development and for a long-term strategic partnership. Sudan has become the second country in Africa to grant Turkey a military base, with Somalia being the first.

The Eritrea Factor

When neocons dominated US foreign policy and the global ‘War on Terror’ was the order of all orders, Eritrea was slapped with sanctions. It was accused of being the primary funder and weapons supplier to al Shabab.

Today, though neither the UN Monitoring Group on Somalia or Eritrea nor any expert free from Ethiopian influence holds such a view, yet the sanctions have not been lifted.

The Ethiopian lobby and certain influential elements within US foreign policy-making circles continue to label Eritrea as a Marxist rogue state that undermines regional institutions such as IGAD and international ones like the UN Security Council; a closed society that espouses a deep rooted hatred towards the West.

Against that backdrop, the UAE has been investing heavily in Eritrea since 2015 or the beginning of the Yemen war that has created one of the the worst humanitarian disasters. The Emirati military (and its Academi/Blackwater shadow) now operates from a military base in Assab. Whether that’s a Trojan Horse or not, is a different discussion altogether.

Ins And Outs

The current wave of discontent against the Ethiopian government is likely to continue. But, considering how the Tigray has a total control on all levers of power, a transition of power will not be an easy process.

Ethiopia is also rumoured to have created an ethnically Somali counterinsurgency force in the Liyu Police. This ruthless force has already been used against the Oromos as they were used against Somalis of various regions that share a border with Ethiopia.

The extrajudicial killings and human rights violations are well documented. Despite all this, the Oromo and Amhara are set to reach their objectives albeit with bruised and bloody faces.

Will their coalition remain or, due to their historical distrust, will each eventually invoke its constitutional right to secede?

Whatever the outcome, any scenario of civil war or chaos in Ethiopia could put the entire Horn in danger and create a potential humanitarian catastrophe, especially in Somalia.

Meanwhile South Sudan is a lightyear away from sustainable political reconciliation especially since the foreign elements fueling the fire are not likely to stop any time soon. Djibouti remains the host of the most intriguing geopolitical circus. So, that leaves Eritrea as an island of stability in the region.

In the foreseeable future, Turkey could divest her investment out of Ethiopia into Sudan, Somalia and Eritrea. China will diversify her portfolio to include Eritrea. And the US — with no new policy — will continue droning her way through geopolitical schizophrenia.

Disclaimer: The viewpoints expressed by the authors do not necessarily reflect the opinions, viewpoints and editorial policies of TRT World.

We welcome all pitches and submissions to TRT World Opinion – please send them via email, to

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Turkey’s foray into Somalia is a huge success, but there are risks



Brendon J. Cannon is an Assistant Professor of International Security, Department of Humanities & Social Science at Khalifa University of Science & Technology (Abu Dhabi, UAE).

THE CONVERSATION –Turkey’s presence in Somalia certainly embodies one of the most interesting regional geopolitical developments in the past decade. It also represents one of the most misunderstood and confusing. Why did Turkey choose Somalia? And, after its initial humanitarian intervention in 2011, what internal and external forces have shaped and expanded that involvement? Furthermore, what explains Turkey’s reported triumphs?

Some have pointed to a shared history and a common Sunni Muslim heritage. This is questionable, at best, and alone cannot explain Turkey’s engagement with Somalia – let alone the rest of sub-Saharan Africa. Others have noted Turkey’s economic clout and its status as a mid-sized country interested in trade rather than extracting resources.

Genuine humanitarian concerns have also, at least initially, driven Turkey’s engagement as well as the prospect of economic gain. Scholar Federico Donelli notes its approach to Somalia

“has made Turkey a regional actor different from the traditional western powers, as well as from the emerging non-western ones.”

Turkey’s approach in Somalia has been largely welcomed inside and outside the African nation. However, a cautionary note is required. Allegations of corruption and bribery have surfaced. Turkey’s recent opening of a military training base in Mogadishu to train the Somali National Army has also raised eyebrows across the wider Horn of Africa region.

Keys to success
Ankara has an understandable and deep seated desire for international recognition as an emerging power and G20 member state. Its status in Somalia is part humanitarian and part financial, but is at its heart about influence and prestige.

Turkish money and aid – delivered directly to key stakeholders in the Somali Federal Government – ingratiated Turkey with local power brokers and provided Ankara with access and power in Mogadishu. What soon followed is Turkish control and management of Somalia’s most lucrative assets, the airport and seaport.

Parallel to these were unilateral rebuilding efforts, offers of scholarships, renovations of hospitals, and the hosting of international conferences about Somalia. These have largely contributed positively to Somalia’s development and yielded the international acclaim and diplomatic clout craved by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and his coterie.

For some parties inside and outside Somalia, Turkey is now viewed as indispensable to Somalia. The keys to Turkey’s reported success in Somalia – where so many other established powers have failed before – may revolve around four critical factors.

The first is approach. Most interventions in Somalia have been multilateral affairs by international and regional actors, such as the UN. Turkey’s approach, in contrast, has been largely unilateral and highly coordinated by the Turkish Cooperation and Coordination Agency. In this way, the efforts of business, government and humanitarian staff either do not overlap or do so effectively.

Second is novelty. Turkey’s Ottoman past and Muslim identity have been raised as major variables driving Turkey’s engagement with Somalia. But these assertions ignore or minimise one of its key strengths as a rising power: its distinct lack of a colonial past that devastated so much of the continent.

This approach is not only novel; it also represents Turkey’s first meaningful engagement with the continent. This contrasts sharply with that of the US, France, Russia and China, among others, which have a colonial or Cold War baggage.

The third factor is risk. Somalia has been the scene of thousands of capacity building and self-help experiments funded by a plethora of international organisations and states. Yet it is precisely where these efforts have failed that Turkey has found its niche.

This required a big appetite for risk. Naturally, as the risks rise the potential for significant rewards does too. The economic rationale for risk among Turkish businesses is particularly high, given experiences in difficult environments such as Iraq and Libya. This has contributed to sensible, if risky actions in Somalia.

Fourth is soft power. Turkey has deployed an array of soft power approaches. These include diplomatic support for Somalia and direct flights on the Turkish national airline from Mogadishu to Istanbul. These pragmatic approaches have also led Turkish businesses to reap major financial rewards and lucrative contracts.

Turkey’s interest has shifted from being primarily humanitarian to one that also takes into account the political and security aspects of the country. Doing so, as stated in the Becoming Global Actor: The Turkish Agenda for the Global South has made the country

“a hybrid non-traditional actor because it combines the traditional political-stability perspective of western powers with the economic-trade perspective of emerging ones.”

It also has broken with the traditional development model for Somalia that has characterised the past three decades.

Hybrid approach
Turkey’s hybrid approach may yet lead to mission creep and draw the country into Somalia’s infamous clan politics. Its increasing role could also put it on a collision course with other states, regionally and internationally.

However, its actions have arguably improved the situation in Somalia over the past six years. This is because Ankara has actually attempted to assuage rather than solve Somalia’s long-standing problems outright. Investment is largely driven by profits and assistance is targeted, coordinated and based on needs.

These interventions rarely come with the types of strings attached that characterise other efforts seeking to restructure Somalia. This has been welcomed by many Somalis for whom requirements for political reform or the creation of accountability mechanisms ring hollow.

Brendon J. Cannon, Assistant Professor of International Security, Department of Humanities and Social Science, Khalifa University

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Islamic Hijab Is More Than Sexuality




Mohamed Ibrahim
Chairman of London Somali Youth Forum, a London based, UK, Social Activist

In reference to the article published on the Evening Standard on 24 January 2016 and written by Nimco Ali who claimed that the Hijab sexualises little girls, I take the view this article is misleading and intended to cause further confusion on a subject, which the writer does not fully have knowledge of.

I respect and support the FGM campaign and the pursuit of equal rights for women and girls everywhere. However, it seems Nimco Ali is now moving the goal post to Hijab wearing young girls. This, I believe, is a distorted view that serves no purpose other than to confuse the public discourse. Hijab, Kippah and the Turban are personnel choice for parents intended to serve a religious purpose for modesty, social protection and religious entity. This is a religious freedom of choice for parents as they are the parental guardians for our children. It is my view the writer is right to start a discussion on the issue. However, the writer fails to understand the Hijab serves many other purposes other than modesty. It is a form of religious identity for our Muslim girls intended to encourage them about their values. It is my view the writer is attacking a value she has missed out on at young age and I would encourage her to seek further knowledge on the subject before throwing extreme form of liberalism on our faces.

I would like to encourage the mainstream media to seek people of knowledge on the subject matter other than channelling their own comforting views through people who clearly do not know what they are talking about. It is becoming a common trend in the media to have Muslims being represented by people who are themselves in need of rehabilitation, distorting the facts and confusing the wider public for personnel interests or beliefs. It is a comforting view for right-wing audience, but serves no purpose for community cohesion,mutual understanding and knowledge.

These writers or activists can express their own opinions. However, when their glass is half full, they can hardly contribute to progress on a subject matter they have no knowledge of. It is also ironic to have a freedom fighter for women/girls seeking to limit the religious freedoms of our parents and children. The writer’s views have no logic of reasoning, coherence and knowledge of this subject matter.

Mohamed Ibrahim

Chairman of London Somali Youth Forum, a London based, UK, Social Activist
@Mi_shiine (Twitter) 

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