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And the 2017 AMPIA Rosies film and television winners are …

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Asha and Road Siad won big with their National Film Board film 19 Days. SUPPLIED

Edmonton Journal — The 2017 Rosie finalists are in and Edmonton prizewinners include three nods for Niobe Thompson and Rosvita Dransfeld’s organ-transplant documentary Memento Mori, three for NFB short documentary 19 Days about refugee families, and the gender binary best performance categories being taken by locals Carlee Tyski in On the Rocks and Jesse Lipscombe for his role in It’s Not My Fault and I Don’t Care Anyway.

In 2015, Thompson won five Rosies for his The Great Human Odyssey, which ran on CBC’s The Nature of Things.

The National Film Board’s Memento Mori, which was filmed in part in Canada’s busiest transplant centre at the University of Alberta Hospital, saw the film crew privileged with tremendous access to literally life-and-death situations, at times emotionally harrowing.

Asha Siad and Roda Siad’s documentary short 19 Days follows refugees at the Margaret Chisholm Resettlement Centre in Calgary’s Bridgeland neighbourhood through a federal-government program lasting the length of the film’s name.

And directed by longtime Edmonton theatre wizard Chris Craddock, It’s Not My Fault and I Don’t Care Anyway recently won the $8,000 Edmonton Film Prize. The film was actor Alan Thicke’s penultimate role, while Lipscombe is well known locally for turning a racist encounter into the #makeitawkward movement, which was applauded by the prime minister on Twitter.

Best Documentary Over 30 Minutes went to I Got Rhythm: The Science of Song, produced by Connie Edwards and written by former Edmonton Journal music writer Helen Metella. It’s a captivating look at cutting edge science and theory linking music — especially played live — to help improve people’s emotional states.

At the Alberta Film and Television Awards ceremony hosted by actress Michelle Thrush Saturday night at the Shaw Conference Centre, final word was given on the winners in 23 class categories awarded to productions and 33 craft categories awarded to individuals including directors, actors, editors and composers.

Of the 56 categories, 35 went to Calgary productions, 19 to Edmonton, one went Red Deer’s way and Best Short Dramatic went to the haunting Gods Acre, directed by Fort Chipewyan’s Kelton Stepanowich.

Calgary’s wrestling rom-com Chokeslam tied with 19 Days and the harrowing Memento Mori, the latter netting Best Director, Best Editor and Best Overall Sound in the non-fiction over 30-minutes categories. 19 Days’ awards are Best Documentary, produced by NFB’s David Christenson; Asha Siad and Roda Siad for Best Screen Writer; and Paul Mortimer as Best Editor — all in non-fiction under 30-minutes.

Fans of our local documentary ecosystem should be especially proud.

Here’s a list of the winners:

CLASS CATEGORIES

Best Documentary series

Going Wild

Bryan Smith, producer

MiMedia

Best Documentary Under 30 Minutes

19 Days

David Christensen, producer

National Film Board of Canada

Best Documentary Over 30 Minutes

I Got Rhythm: The Science of Song

Connie Edwards, producer

Souleado Entertainment

Best Dramatic Series

Wynonna Earp

Tom Cox and Jordy Randall, producers

SEVEN24 Films

 Best Dramatic feature or Made-for-TV Movie

Chokeslam

Carolyn McMaster, producer

Chaos a Film Company

Best Children’s Program or Series

Squeaks & Cheeks

Rebecca Campbell, producer

Catapult Productions

Best news feature

Car 1202

Michelle Gayse Leader, producer

Leader Productions

Best Information or Lifestyle Series

Why I Love: Lloydminster

Matt Embry, Ravinder Minhas & Laura O’Grady, producers

Spotlight Productions

 Best Television Commercial Under $50K

#loveyyc

Matt Gillespie & Karen Sveinson, producers

Joe Media Group

Best Television Commercial Over $50K

ATB Financial — ATB Listens: Resonate

Brent Kawchuk, Rita LeRoux, Sharon Toewes & Max Wawruck, producers

Corkscrew Media and Stir Films

Best Public Service or Not-For-Profit Production

Historica Canada — Heritage Minute — Viola Desmond

Brent Kawchuk, producer

Corkscrew Media and Stir Films

Best corporate Production

ATB Financial “Amplify” — Anthem

Matt Gillespie & Claudia Neff, producers

Joe Media Group

Best Promotional Production

Stampede Things

Cindy Gillies, Mike Little and Brendon Rathbone, producers

Shine Light — Calgary Stampede

Best Musical Program or Variety Program

The Stage Gets Bigger

Rod Maldaner and Brett Kissel, producers

Shaw TV

Best Music Video

Hello Moth — “A Song About Transience”

Hello Moth and Aaron Bernakevitch, producers

4K Film Production

Best Fiction Web Series

COWTOWN

Ramin Eshraghi-Yazdi, producer

Nur Films

 Best Web Series Non-Fiction

How To Learn Anything — Puzzles In Odd Places

Stephen Robinson and Lindsay Robinson, producers

Zipline Productions

Best Digital or Interactive Project

Fairness Works: Refugee Crisis

Ryan Lang, Caitlin Kangles and Lucia Trischuk, producers

Redline Interactive

Best Short Dramatic

Gods Acre

Kelton Stepanowich, Eric Janvier and Mike Mankowski, producers

Half Breed Films

Best Short Non-Fiction

The Former Life of Amber Valley

Matt Embry, Ravinder Minhas and Laura O’Grady, producers

Spotlight Productions and Telus Optik Local

Best Sports Event Production

ESPN Indy 500 — “One Driver, One Car”

Brian Vos, producer

Jump Studios

Best Production Reflecting Cultural Diversity

Fairness Works: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

Ryan Lang, Caitlin Kangles and Lucia Trischuk, producers

Redline Interactive

Best Student Production

The Hundy

Karlee McTavish, producer

Film and Video, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

CRAFT CATEGORIES

Best Director

(Drama under 30 minutes)

Brendon Rathbone

Marauder

Picture Element

Best Director

(Drama over 30 minutes)

Robert Cuffley

Chokeslam

Chaos a Film Company

 Best Director (Non-Fiction under 30 minutes)

Laura O’Grady

Queer Hutterite: A TELUS Original

Spotlight Productions

Best Director (Non-Fiction over 30 minutes)

Niobe Thompson

Memento Mori

ID Productions & National Film Board of Canada

Best Performance by an Alberta Actor

Jesse Lipscombe

It’s Not My Fault And I Don’t Care Anyway

Mosaic Entertainment

Best Performance by an Alberta Actress

Carlee Ryski

On the Rocks

Guerrilla Motion Pictures

Best Television Host

Donovan Workun

Alberta Motor Association- “Football & Pizza 73”

Freshwater Creative

Best Narrator

Maureen Jones

It’s All In Your Head

Ear Candy

Best Screenwriter

(Drama under 30 minutes)

Arun Lakra

Probability

Best Screenwriter

(Drama over 30 minutes)

Jason Long and Robert Cuffley

Chokeslam

Chaos a Film Company

Best Screenwriter (Non-Fiction under 30 minutes)

Asha Siad & Roda Siad

19 Days

National Film Board of Canada

 Best Screenwriter (Non-Fiction Over 30 minutes)

Niobe Thompson

Vital Bonds

ID Productions & National Film Board of Canada

Best Cinematographer (Drama under 30 minutes)

Aaron Bernakevitch

Dear Kate

Farside Pictures & Propeller Studios

Best Cinematographer (Drama over 30 minutes)

Bradley Stuckel

Incontrol

Umbrella Collective Films

Best Cinematographer (Non-Fiction under 30 minutes)

Shaun Henning

ATCO Wonderland

Spruce Meadows Television

Best Cinematographer (Non-Fiction over 30 minutes)

Sergio Olivares

The Secret Life of Pianos

Productions Loft

Best Editor (Drama under 30 minutes)

Weyme Teeter

One, One Thousand

Moving Artistry Productions

Best Editor (Drama over 30 minutes)

Bridget Durnford

Chokeslam

Chaos a Film Company

Best Editor (Non-Fiction under 30 minutes)

Paul Mortimer

19 Days

National Film Board of Canada

Best Editor (Non-Fiction over 30 minutes)

Scott Parker

Memento Mori

ID Productions & National Film Board of Canada

Best Overall Sound (Drama under 30 minutes)

Alex Mitchell & Frank Laratta

Marauder

Picture Element

Best Overall Sound (Drama over 30 minutes)

Frank Laratta

Van Helsing — “Seen You”

Nomadic Pictures

Best Overall Sound (Non-Fiction under 30 minutes)

Chris Vail

Tourism Calgary Push Play: Chad Saunders

Six Degrees Music & Sound

Best Overall Sound (Non-Fiction over 30 minutes)

Philip Dransfeld, Carey Opper, Johnny Blerot

Memento Mori

ID Productions & National Film Board of Canada

Best Original Musical Score (Drama under 30 minutes)

Beau Shiminsky

It’s All In Your Head

Ear Candy

Best Original Musical Score (Drama over 30 minutes)

Alec Harrison

Considering Love and Other Magic

Interstate 80 Entertainment

Best Original Musical Score (Non-Fiction under 30 minutes)

Beau Shiminsky

Against the Ropes — “The Raging Bull”

Gruv Pix Productions

Best Original Musical Score (Non-Fiction over 30 minutes)

John McMillan

Vital Bonds

ID Productions & National Film Board of Canada

Best Production Designer/Art Director

Shari Aspinall

She Has A Name

Unveil Studios

Best Costume Designer

Carol Case

Hell On Wheels — “Two Soldiers”

Nomadic Pictures

 Best Make-up and Hair Artist(s)

Lisa Belyea

Lost Face

Joe Media Group

Best Visual Effects

Deja Springfield

Tiny Plastic Men

Mosaic Entertainment

Best Animator / Motion Graphic Artist(s)

Shawn Fehrenbach, Aaron Bilawchuk and Jordan Balinski

Internet 150 Cash Flow

Shaw Cablesystems GP

fgriwkowsky@postmedia.com

@fisheyefoto

Arts & Culture

MINNESOTA: Gustavus professor, student to show documentary on Somali-Americans

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Southern Minn — The hopes and experiences of several Somali-Americans are shown in “(Mid)west of Somalia,” a documentary by a professor-student team at Gustavus Adolphus College.

The film will be shown in its first local public showing at 7 p.m. March 1 at St. Peter High School Performing Arts Center.

Communications studies professor Martin Lang said it was project he embarked on, knowing there was more to the Somali-American story than the reports about terrorism recruitment or conflicts with new neighbors.

“As I’ve lived here in St. Peter for a dozen years now, I’ve come to know more and more of the population in St. Peter and the Somali population in particular,” he said. “I’ve come to know diverse sides of them. It was such a contrast with what I had learned and had known about Somali immigrants smashed up against the people I was meeting and I knew I can’t be the only one surprised at what is below the surface here.”

He and student Noah O’Ryan did the bulk of filming in the summer of 2016.

They talked with Somali-American community leaders as well as people they knew personally, and those connections helped them network more widely. The documentary subjects are all at least part-time students with at least part-time jobs. They primarily live in Mankato or St. Peter; a few are from Faribault.

Lang said they didn’t set out for the film to focus on people pursuing education. He suspects that is a product of the location and so many young Somali-Americans are seeking to do their best.

“Education is a really high priority for Somali families, especially for the first generation,” he said. “The millennial generation feels a really strong responsibility to do right by the family’s sacrifice.”

Lang said Somali-Americans are like many Minnesotans. They value education, want their hard work and effort respected and intend to be “fully fledged, contributing members of our communities in a variety of ways,” he said.

Hanan Mohamud is a senior at Gustavus Adolphus College from Faribault. She is pursuing a psychology degree and wants to be a physician’s assistant. She’s one of the Somali-Americans profiled in the documentary.

She was approached by Lang about being in the film a few years after she was in his public discourse class. She agreed to be involved because “It was empowering and I had a lot to say.” She also connected him to two others.

Mohamud said she agreed, in part, to combat demeaning stereotypes.

“Most people honestly have no idea,” she said. “They think we’re living off welfare and whatnot. A lot of us go to school and only came to the country to get an education.”

Education is something that can’t be taken away and can help their home country. She said the documentary shows what she and others have experienced in the U.S., along with their aspirations and their priorities.

“It’s a very good film,” Mohamud said. “There’s some humor in it and, obviously, there are serious parts. It looked well put-together and he made sure the voices of people he was filming were well heard.”

Some of the documentary’s subjects will be part of a panel with Lang after the showing. The documentary, which runs about 35 minutes, has been shown a few times to small groups, but this is the first large public viewing.

The showing comes as part of the first Thursday film series by the Nicollet County Historical Society and Community and Family Education. It is also sponsored by the college, city Department of Leisure and Recreation Services and Senior Center.

“I think this is an important film because it tells the story of people who live, work, and attend school in this area,” Community and Family Education Director Tami Skinner said. “I hope that it will generate conversations in the community which will lead people to reach out to their new neighbors.”

Lang said he hopes it spurs understanding and conversation.

“The bigger picture for me is communication and dialog and in sort of a difficult political time, dialog is so much harder than it used to be,” he said. “It’s so important for all of us to be able to talk and pay attention to each other at least a little bit. I want to inspire conversation across divides that keep us apart.”

I think this is an important film because it tells the story of people who live, work, and attend school in this area. I hope that it will generate conversations in the community which will lead people to reach out to their new neighbors.

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Arts & Culture

David Bowie’s Widow Iman attends Black Panther premiere

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DAILY MAIL — She has made a gradual return to the social scene, after taking some time away from the limelight, following the January 2016 death of her husband David Bowie.

And Iman showed off the supermodel prowess that first caught the eye of her late rocker husband, when she attended a special screening of Black Panther of Tuesday.

The 62-year-old beauty looked radiant as she arrived at the Museum of Modern Art in a shimmering silver floor-length gown, which she teamed with a stylish head wrap.

She has made a gradual return to the social scene, after taking some time away from the limelight, following the January 2016 death of her husband David Bowie.

And Iman showed off the supermodel prowess that first caught the eye of her late rocker husband, when she attended a special screening of Black Panther of Tuesday.

The 62-year-old beauty looked radiant as she arrived at the Museum of Modern Art in a shimmering silver floor-length gown, which she teamed with a stylish head wrap.

Iman made a triumphant return to the spotlight last year, following the death of her beloved husband David in January 2016.

Last summer, she paid a moving tribute to the late musical icon on what would have been the couple’s 25th wedding anniversary.

The Somalia-born beauty shared a post to remember her singer love, who tragically died aged 69 after a secret battle with liver cancer.

Alongside a black and white picture of the pair, a short piece of text read: ‘I would walk forever, just to be in your arms again.’

The image was captioned by Iman with the simple words: ‘June 6th #BowieForever’.

Bowie and Iman officially married in Switzerland in April 1992, but held a church ceremony in Italy on June 6 of that year.

They had one daughter together, Alexandria, who’s now 17. She is also the mother of 39-year-old daughter Zulekha, from her marriage to marriage to former basketball star Spencer Haywood.

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KENYA

Kenyan and German filmmakers celebrate Oscar nod

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TRT — “Watu Wote” is one of the first Kenyan films to be nominated for an Oscar for Best Live Action Short Film.

“Watu Wote” means “All of Us” in Swahili, the language spoken in Kenya. It depicts the true story of an extremist terror attack on a bus in the country.

Al Shabab militants attacked the bus in north-eastern Kenya just before Christmas, on December 21, 2015.

During the attack, some of the Muslim passengers helped shield and save the lives of a group of their fellow Christian passengers.

The incident inspired German film students to make a film about the attack.

“Oh, it just feels surreal, still,” said director Katja Benrath of the nomination.

The students had read about the attack in the German newspapers and decided to tell the story, based on its message of humanity and solidarity.

The film competes against four other films in the Best Live Action Short Film category at the 90th Academy Awards on March 4 2018 in Los Angeles.

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